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Eventide

Rose opened her eyes and screamed.

"Rose!"

Hearing Jack stumbling towards her, she sought his outstretched hands and drew him into a tight embrace. "I can't see."

"That makes two of us." Jack's hands ghosted over her face.

"Ow!" The Doctor trod on something unexpected in the dark. "Are you both all right?"

"Aside from the sudden onset of blindness?" Rose and Jack both reached for the Doctor.

"I didn't mention the cultural darkness thing did I?" The Doctor ignored the snorts of his companions. "We'll be fine in the morning."

"Can you stay 'til then?" Rose pulled him closer.

--

dw100challenge #167: pitch
dw100challenge #168: mail/male

Comments

( 5 howls — talk to the wolf )
ozma914
16th Oct, 2007 07:53 (UTC)
I've been in cultural darkness before, too. Ah, the Clinton years ...
redwolf
16th Oct, 2007 10:03 (UTC)
I've always been a bit weirded out by bedrooms that have absolute darkness. Probably just used to ambient light (and strange nocturnal explosions from the oil refinery I used to live near) so darkness seems wrong.
ozma914
17th Oct, 2007 06:22 (UTC)
absolute darkness
Oh, absolutely. I live in town; streetlights, passing cars, and such. Over the summer I spent some time in a lake cottage, and the total darkness made it very difficult for me to sleep, not to mention the dead silence.

It doesn't help that I work at night, so when I'm sleeping there's a certain amount of daylight in the room, no matter how heavy my curtains are.
chessie_reeves
17th Oct, 2007 06:53 (UTC)
Tender moments—nicely done.

As for absolute darkness, I have a hard time dealing with that as well.
redwolf
17th Oct, 2007 07:15 (UTC)
I guess it's what you're used to and now most people would have some ambient light around at all times, so its loss is strange.
( 5 howls — talk to the wolf )